The Right Tool For the Right Job – Part 1

September 20, 2011

 

All too Common

You have questions. How do you get your answers? The methods and the tools used to help get those answers to business questions will vary per organization. For those without established BI solutions; using desktop database query and spreadsheet tools are…all too common. And…If there is a BI tool in place, usage and its longevity are dependent on its capabilities, costs to maintain it and ease of use for both development staff and business users. Decreased BI tool adoption, due to rising costs, lack of functionality and complexity may increase dependencies on technical resources and other home grown solutions to get answers. IT departments have numerous responsibilities. Running queries and creating reports may be ancillary, which can result in information not getting out in a timely manner, questions going unanswered and decisions being delayed. Therefore, the organization may not be leveraging its BI investment for what it was originally designed to do…empower business user to create actionable information.

(Read the similar experiences of Pentaho customer Kiva.org here)

Six of One, Half a Dozen of the Other

The BI market is saturated with BI tools, from the well known proprietary vendors to the established commercial open source leaders and niche players. There are choices that include the “Cloud,” on premise, hosted (SaaS) and even embedded. Let’s face it and not complicate things…most, if not all, of the BI tools out there can do the same thing in some form or fashion. They are designed to access, optimize and visualize data that will aid in the answering of questions and tracking of business performance. Dashboards, Reporting and Analysis fall under a category I refer as “Content Delivery.” These methods of delivering information are the foundation of a typical BI solution. They provide the most common means for tracking performance and identifying problems that need attention. But..did you know, there is usually some sort of prep work to be done, before that chart or traffic light is displayed on your screen or printed in that report? That prep work can range from simple ETL scripting to provisioning more robust Data Warehouse and Metadata Repositories.

Data Integration

Content Delivery should begin first with some sort of Data Integration. In my 15 years in the BI space I have not seen one customer or prospect challenge me on this. They all have “data” in multiple silos. They all have a “need” to access it, consolidate it, extrapolate it and make it available for analysis and reporting applications. Whether they use it already as second-hand data, loaded into an Enterprise Data Warehouse for historical purposes, or produce Operational Data Stores, they are using Data Integration. Whether they are writing code to access and move the data, using a proprietary utility or even some ETL tool, they are using Data Integration. It is important to realize that not all data needs to be “optimized” out of the gate, as it is not only the data that is important. It is how it will be used in the day to day activities supporting the questions that will be asked. This requires careful planning and consideration of the overall objectives that the BI tools will be supporting.

Well, How do I know what tools to use? – Stay Tuned

With so many tools available, how will you know what is right for the organization? Thorough investigation of the tools through RFIs, RFPs, self evaluation and POCs are a good start. However, make sure you are selecting tools based on the ability to solve your specific current AND future needs and not solely because it looks cool and provides only the “sex and sizzle” the executives are after. The typical need is always reporting, analysis and dashboards. Little realize that there is a lot more to it than those three little words. In the next part of this article I will cover a few of the most common “BI Profiles” that are in almost every organization. In each profile I will cover the pains, symptoms and impacts that plague organizations today as well as the solution strategies and limitations you should be aware of when looking at Pentaho.

Stay tuned!

Regards,

Michael Tarallo
Director of Enterprise Solutions
Pentaho

This blog was originally posted on http://michaeltarallo.blogspot.com/ on September 19, 2011

Customer Success with Pentaho: Kiva.org

September 7, 2011

Pentaho is very excited to share with you our latest customer success story about Kiva.org, a non-profit micro finance platform, who have adopted Pentaho BI Enterprise Edition to automate their reporting and analytical capabilities. Kiva has gone from a “spread-mart” environment where each department had different views of disparate data sources, to being able to validate and publicize numbers company-wide.

Since its founding in 2005, Kiva.org has rapidly grown and made possible over $225 million in microloans between individual lenders and entrepreneurs all around the world.  To keep pace with increasing demand for its service, Kiva realized it needed a flexible, scalable and cost-effective data warehouse and reporting system that would be able to unify a variety of data sources and satisfy an equally varied number of customers of that data.

To achieve this, the team adopted an Agile BI and real-time data flow based on Pentaho.  Kiva believes that the return on investment with Pentaho has been almost immediate. By replacing Excel, Kiva is already seeing payback with people outside of IT analyzing their own data and creating their own reports. This allows Kiva’s engineering team to focus on the heavy lifting that its website requires rather than building custom reports.

With access to analytical tools, Kiva for the first time is empowering users and has turned its employees into true knowledge workers, a critical improvement when running an online microfinance organization that requires rapid, daily — if not hourly — decision-making.

“Using Pentaho and our data warehouse, we can break down a metric and do specific analysis to identify under-performing partners in just 20 minutes. In the past, that same query would take all night using an Excel grid,” said Greg Allen, a business analyst at Kiva.org.

Visit Pentaho.com to read the full story of how Kiva uses Pentaho to automate its reporting and analytical capabilities.

Join the Pentaho Lending Team on Kiva.org to start making an impact.


Top 10 Reasons Behind Pentaho’s Success

September 2, 2011

To continue our revival of old blog posts, today we have our #2 most popular blog from last July. Pentaho is now 7 years old, with sales continually move up and to the right. In a crazy economy, many are asking, “What is the reason behind your growth and success?” Richard Daley reflected on this question after reporting on quartlery results in 2010 .

*****Originally posted on July 20, 2010*****

Today we announced our Q2 results. In summary Pentaho:

  • More than doubled new Enterprise Edition Subscriptions from Q2 2009 to Q2 2010.
  • Exceeded goals resulting in Q2 being the strongest quarter in company history and most successful for the 3rd quarter in a row.
  • Became the only vendor that lets customers choose the best way to access BI: on-site, in the cloud, or on the go using an iPad.
  • Led the industry with a series of market firsts including delivering on Agile BI.
  • Expanded globally, received many industry recognitions and added several stars to our executive bench.

How did this happen? Mostly because of our laser focus over the past 5 years to build the leading end-to-end open source BI offering. But if we really look closely over the last 12-18 months there are some clear signs pointing to our success (my top ten list):

Top 10 reasons behind Pentaho’s success:

1.     Customer Value – This is the top of my list. Recent analyst reports explain how we surpassed $2 billion mark during Q2 in terms of cumulative customer savings on business intelligence and data integration license and maintenance costs. In addition, ranked #1 in terms of value for price paid and quality of consulting services amongst all Emerging Vendors.

2.     Late 2008-Early 2009 Global Recession – this was completely out of our control but it helped us significantly by forcing companies to look for lower cost BI alternatives that could deliver the same or better results than the high priced mega-vendor BI offerings. Making #1 more attractive to companies worldwide.

3.     Agile BI – we announced our Agile BI initiative in Nov 2009 and received an enormous amount of press and positive reception from the community, partners, and customers. We’ve been showing previews and releasing RCs in Q1-Q2 2010 and put PDI 4.0 in GA at the end of Q2 2009.

4.     Active Community – A major contributing factor to our massive industry adoption is our growing number of developer stars (the Pentaho army) that continue to introduce Pentaho into new BI and data integration projects. Our community triples the amount of work of our QA team, contributes leading plug-ins like CDA and PAT, writes best-selling books about our technologies and self-organizes to spread the word.

5.    BI Suite 3.5 & 3.6 – 3.5 was a huge release for the company and helped boost adoption and sales in Q3-Q4 2009. This brought our reporting up to and beyond that of competitors. In Q2 2010 the Pentaho BI Suite 3.6 GA brought this to another level including enhancements and new functionality for enterprise security, content management and team development as well as the new Enterprise Edition Data integration Server.  The 3.6 GA also includes the new Agile BI integrated ETL, modeling and data visualization environment.

6.     Analyzer – the addition of Pentaho Analyzer to our product lineup in Sept-Oct 2009 was HUGE for our users – the best web-based query and reporting product on the market.

7.     Enterprise Edition 30-Day Free Evaluation – we started this “low-touch/hassle free” approach in March 2009 and it has eliminated the pains that companies used to have to go thru in order to evaluate software.

8.     Sales Leadership – Lars Nordwall officially took over Worldwide Sales in June 2009 and by a combination of building upon the existing talent and hiring great new team members, he has put together a world-class team and best practices in place.

9.     Big Data Analytics – we launched this in May 2010 and have received very strong support and interest in this area. We currently have a Pentaho-Hadoop beta program with over 40 participants. There is a large and unfulfilled requirement for Data Integration and Analytic solutions in this space.

10.   Whole Product & Team – #1-#9 wouldn’t work unless we had all of the key components necessary to succeed – doc, training, services, partners, finance, qa, dev, vibrant community, IT, happy customers and of course a sarcastic CTO ;-)

Thanks to the Pentaho team, community, partners and customers for this great momentum. Everyone should be extremely proud with the fact that we are making history in the BI market. We have a great foundation in which to continue this rapid growth, and with the right team and passion, we’ll push thru our next phase of growth over the next 6-12 months.

Quick story to end the note:  I was talking and white boarding with one of my sons a few weeks ago (yes, I whiteboard with my kids) and he was asking certain questions about our business (how do we make money, why are we different than our competitors, etc.) and I explained at a high level how we are basically “on par and in many cases better” than the Big Guys (IBM, ORCL, SAP) with regards to product, we provide superior support/services, yet we cost about 10% as much as they do. To which my son replied, “Then why doesn’t everyone buy our product?”  Exactly.

Richard
CEO, Pentaho


What is Agile BI? Your answers from business user to fluff

August 18, 2011

As of today we have 110 posts on BI from the Swamp blog. Over the next two weeks we are going to repost the most popular blogs on BI from the Swamp since it launched in March 2010. Today’s blog was originally posted on May 12, 2010 by Doug Moran to highlight the results of our ‘What is Agile BI?’ contest. Over a year later, Agile BI continues to be the hot topic. For example, the theme of the TDWI World conference last week was Evolving your Agile BI Environment. Multiple times at the conference we were asked how Pentaho defined the term, Agile BI. A quick an easy answer was to point them to the blog below and to our Agile BI Practical Guide.

****************** original post from May 12, 2010*****************

Last month, Pentaho sponsored a contest where people answer the question -“What does agile BI mean?”  I was lucky enough to be one of the judges to determine who made it to the final five and win a Flip Ultra™ camcorder.  The results were posted today http://www.pentaho.com/what_is_agile/. Now it’s up to the community to vote for their favorite answer and the winner gets an iPad – (yes, that means you).

When reading through hundreds of entries I began to see a pattern and being an old BI guy, that meant I had to make a pie chart. The answers fell into 5 main groups: BI Solution Development, Business Users, Entire Business marketing Fluff and Other.

Almost 34% of the entries cited Agile BI as an iterative methodology for developing BI solutions involving the end user as early and often as possible.  It is exemplified by one of the finalists “Agile is about speeding up the design/create/ship/observe cycle. The more you ship and observe, the better you learn to design and do. Whether you’re headed in the wrong direction or the right one, it’s imperative that you find that out as soon as possible.” Exactly what we have started with the PDI 4.0 release and are continuing to focus on.

A full 25% of the responses focused on the business user with quotes like, “Agile is never being caught flat-footed – being able to react and adapt with ease, leaving competitors in your wake.” The ability for end users to explore and analyze business data beyond static reporting is very important.  Applications like Pentaho Analyzer and Web-based Ad hoc Query and Reporting address this need. The modeling perspective added to PDI 4.0 reduces the complexity and learning curve associated with building metadata models and schemas in order to put that analytical power into the end user’s hands.

A little over 12% were not concerned whether the agility was on the development or user side.  They just knew that the business had to react quickly to changing business conditions.  “Agile means being able to rapidly adjust to changing conditions with speed and accuracy” was a typical response in this category.

Exactly 15% of people responded with what I call fluffy messages. These were creative and got the most attention from our marketing people (I wasn’t the only judge)  “The antonym to SAP”, “Less work, more money” and “Agile (with Pentaho) means never having to say you’re sorry.”

The last 14% were entries like “agile is eliga read backwards” and the self-referencing “The only way to make agile decisions.” Not sure where they were going with some of these but they were also entertaining.

Out of the entries, there were nine attempts to make a phrase by using words that start with the letters A-G-I-L-E. Two people submitted papers on agile BI.  We even had a submission written in Haiku.  No one went for the extra creativity points by using video or interpretive dance.  We didn’t get any abusive, obscene or SPAM entries, which was nice.

There were only two negative responses complaining that Agile BI was marketing hype.  Here is one of them, “Two answers. 1. Personally, “Agile BI” means nothing to me. Sounds like yet another attempt by marketing to create an artificial differentiator. 2. If I had to describe “Agile BI” or die, I’d say, “An Agile BI environment enables an organization’s people and processes to quickly adapt to new or changed user requirements, ideally through self-learning and pre-emptive adjustments.” Answer two is exactly what we intend to enable with this initiative and when we are successful, that will prove the number one answer wrong.

Pentaho is committed to Agile BI. We believe our development plan is in line with the majority of respondents to this contest. PDI 4.0 is a great start but it is just the first steps and we are using this feedback to help set the product roadmap for the next half of this year and beyond. Thank you for participating! Please vote for one of the finalists.

Doug Moran
Pentaho Community Guy


The New School of BI: An Agile BI Practical Guide

August 9, 2011

According to The Data Warehousing Institute (TDWI), “Agile business intelligence addresses a broad need to enable flexibility by accelerating the time it takes to deliver value with BI projects.”

Essentially, TDWI’s definition of Agile BI is doing more in less time. Of course, that sounds very appealing, but the question is: How does Agile BI accomplish more in less time?

As a pioneer in Agile BI, Pentaho has interviewed several customers using our Agile BI solution and have found that the most effective approach to BI includes the following actions:

  • Creating smaller projects that add up to the big picture
  • Rapidly deploying the initial solution, focusing on a few reports or metrics at a time
  • Building on that foundation with frequent iterations and checkpoints
  • Facilitating constant collaboration between Business and IT  throughout the life of the project

By starting small and growing bigger through multiple iterations, Agile BI creates a rapid development environment for BI project teams and avoids keeping IT working in a vacuum. These projects stay on track and improve over time through constant collaboration between business and technical users.

Unfortunately, most of practitioners still approach BI the old-school way. This is due to the industry culture, outdated skills in the market and access to only traditional/proprietary BI tools that have dominated the market for the past 10 to 20 years.

The times have changed. The BI buyer now has several options such as: Data Discovery tools, Cloud-based and hosted solutions, and unified Data Integration and Visualization platforms. The new school rules have opened the playing field making it easier for BI practitioners to be more productive and get something up and running quickly.

Download the Agile BI Practical Guide – How to Lead your BI Project with a Brand New Approach which was developed via insight gained from interviewing our customers who have previous experience with other BI tools before choosing Pentaho. The guide summarizes the top three major reasons that BI projects fail and describes a simple four-step process for solving these issues.

If you are attending TDWI World Conference in San Diego this week make sure to stop by our booth (#209) to learn more about Pentaho Agile BI.


Open Source Fuels “Power To The User”

June 22, 2011

Traditionally open source Business Intelligence (OSBI) has been adopted by individuals with an “I” in their acronym: IT, SI, and ISVs.  This made sense because Open Source software started with deep technical roots in operating systems, appservers, RDBMSs, ESBs, etc., and when Pentaho pioneered OSBI in 2004 it was no different. The OSBI landscape back then was filled with some very nice technical projects, some desire from the “then current” open source proponents to move higher in the stack, and the overwhelming BI market screaming for disruption in the form of better products, better architectures and better pricing.

Over the next few years Pentaho built out a great BI platform with end-to-end BI capabilities and quickly became known as “The” OS BI Suite vendor. In conjunction with building product, we built out vibrant open source communities that helped spur our growth and adoption. We were the only clear alternative to Business Objects, Cognos, Oracle and Microstrategy, and the market was hungry for a better and more appropriately-priced offering. We’ve experienced incredible growth over the last couple of years as we continue to deliver great, solid, scalable, secure and functionally-rich products to the market – both to our open source communities and to our paying customers and partners.

In 2009 we started delivering more products geared toward the “business user,” a.k.a. “end-user,” a.k.a. “casual user,” a.k.a. “non-techie.” We immediately started seeing more people convert into customers and this trend grew significantly all the way through 2010. This was a great move in that direction, but we knew that another gap needed to be plugged in order to really satisfy growing market needs – better web-based reporting and data visualization as well as an easier way to get to data. People want results fast and easy, especially the “non-technical user.”  Voila, Pentaho BI 4.0 directly addresses these needs and pain points.  Check it all out here in our Pentaho BI 4 resource center.

Pentaho BI 4 is our biggest release ever that’s geared toward the business user. This product makes it not only possible, but makes it easy for business users to access their own data and do their own reporting, analytics, data discovery and dashboards. We’ve shielded users from the underlying complexities while also giving them the power that they desire.  Our open source roots make it clear that we are all about the people, and this release specifically extends that philosophy to include the “non-technical people.”

Pentaho BI 4 will greatly expand our addressable market size and customer profile. Our early feedback from customers, partners and communities indicates that this is a huge inflection point for our product line and company.  Our launch webcast on Thursday June 23 – Pentaho BI 4 Live – has already broken our previous webcast registration by 250%!

There must be some real unsolved thirst for pushing power to the user.

Richard


What does the economic buyer of Agile BI know that you don’t?

May 18, 2011

Agile is a familiar term to product managers and software developers who are looking to build rapid prototypes and iterate through software development life cycles fairly quickly and effectively.

With recent market trends, Agile has now made it to the agenda of the economic BI buyer. If you are a CFO, CIO, or CEO, and have been hearing about Agile BI in the industry, you are probably looking to quantify the benefits of Agile BI in terms of direct cost savings.

As a CxO you know that your Business Intelligence costs are mainly driven by these 4 areas:

  1. License acquisition costs
  2. Skill development and training
  3. Project deployment duration and man hours
  4. Ongoing cost of change management once the solution is deployed

The question is whether Agile BI can save you costs in any of these categories? While Agile BI can immediately imply faster deployment of the BI solution (#3 above), in Pentaho we add value in all the 4 areas. Here is how:

  1. Consolidation of licenses: Any BI implementation requires some form of Data Integration, Data Warehousing/Data Mart development, and Data Visualization (Reports, Analysis, and Dashboards). Current BI vendors in the market have disparate products for each of these areas, and offer each product at a separate license acquisition and maintenance cost. Pentaho provides great value in this area as it includes all these components in “one” subscription to Pentaho BI Suite Enterprise Edition, giving you an ultimate price tag that is by far a fraction of the cost of other BI tools in the market.
  2. Collapsing skill sets into one: Each specialized tool mentioned above also requires a set of highly trained staff. In a traditional BI project, a crew of ETL Developers, DBAs, Data Modelers, and BI Developers were involved, each building one piece of the big puzzle. An all in one tool such as Pentaho BI Suite EE offers “one” single integrated tool set for all areas of BI development. This enables organizations to collapse the diverse skill sets into one. This level of self-sufficiency reduces the amount of IT staff that needs to be on board for building and maintaining a successful BI program.
  3. Rapid deployment – Pentaho offers an Agile Development Environment, as part of its BI Suite EE. This integrated data integration and business intelligence development environment turns data to decision in a matter of days as opposed to months/ years. Interactive data explorations and visualizations for slicing and dicing data across multiple sources are instantly auto-generated using this tool. Unlike a waterfall approach, this tool allows business and technical teams to build quick prototypes, and iterate upon that all within a unified workspace that empowers sharing, collaboration, and rapid results.
  4. Rapid change management – The need for quick turnarounds when adding additional business metrics or changing existing ones is a reality in BI deployments. When disparate tools are used, adding a new data source, or changing a metric, can take a long time. With Agile BI Development Environment, unique to Pentaho, any change to ETL flows or to the business semantic layer, is automatically reflected in the visualization layer (Reporting, Analysis, Dashboards). This helps organizations to quickly incorporate changes and adjust their BI solution to current business requirements, without long wait times and IT bottleneck delays.

Ready to start saving? How about this….try the Agile BI functionality of Pentaho BI Suite or Pentaho Data Integration for FREE (30-day supported enterprise evaluation). Ready now?

Farnaz Erfan
Product Marketing Manager
Pentaho Corporation


IT needs vs. Business needs

March 22, 2011

Can Business and IT finally live in harmony when it comes to BI?

This is not a new concept or question. In fact, for the last several years pretty much all BI vendors claimed that they have solved the “Business and IT Collaboration” needs. Or, at least their marketing departments did!

To truly solve a problem, we must first fully understand it. In this case it is important to ask questions such as: Why is there a lack of collaboration between these two groups? What is so drastically different about these two groups that have forced such a gap between them?

The truth is that IT needs a central ownership to information to streamline processes and ensure sustainability, while business users want their own self-service and ownership to gain results faster. After all business users have become a lot more analysis and data savvy these days as compared to the past; so, an old-school approach of letting IT do the work and just being the consumers of canned reports doesn’t cut it anymore.

Perhaps this picture illustrates the differences more clearly.

As you can see, these two groups are clearly in conflict when it comes to how they like to manage their information. So, we ask: What will help these two groups to start working in harmony?

The truth is that it won’t happen… unless there is a ‘balance’ between their needs.

As much as business users want quick time to value out of their BI projects, one-off applications are not sustainable overtime. They become monsters that are too hard to keep up-to-date, considering all the changes that happen to business requirements over time. Sooner or later, business users will need to reach to their IT friends for help.

The ‘balance’ lies in letting the business users get fast time to value, but still building applications that are sustainable to change. We define this ‘balance’ with an Agile BI approach:

  • Quick prototyping and visualization of the results
  • Frequent iterations and reviews between business and IT users to ‘get it right’
  • Once the data is ‘fit-for-purpose’, providing self-service tools for business users to be self-sufficient in building their own reports, analysis, and dashboards
  • Having a strong ‘shared’ metadata foundation across the board to adjust to changes quickly and to scale up with cumulative iterations

So back to our point about collaboration between business and IT: It is possible? Yes. Does it happen because a set of ‘tools’ facilitate this collaboration? Not necessarily, but they can help. What is the secret ingredient then to ensure such collaboration occurs? Simple: This collaboration happens as long as these two groups need each other, and are working towards a set of common / balanced goals for their BI projects. Something that is only possible with an Agile BI approach.

For more information about this topic and to explore how Pentaho has made Agile BI possible, attend our upcoming webinar on How to Fast Track Your BI Projects with Agile BI and see for yourself how Pentaho customers have come to reap the value of their BI projects with Pentaho’s Agile BI initiative.

Farnaz Erfan
Product Marketing Manager
Pentaho Corporation


Q&A with Pentaho Trainer Lynn Yarbrough

March 14, 2011

Q&A is a series on the Business Intelligence from the Swamp Blog that interviews key members of the Pentaho team to learn more about their focus at Pentaho and outlook on the Business Intelligence industry.

If you have attended a Pentaho training class, most likely you have had a chance to meet the knowledgeable and entertaining Lynn Yarbrough. To get to know Lynn and our training classes better we asked Lynn 5 questions.

1.  What brought you to Pentaho and what do you do?

I am a trainer at Pentaho. After almost 20 years in the BI and Data Integration industry working at companies like Information Builders and Hyperion, I wanted to work at a smaller Business Intelligence company and I found a job posting for a training position at Pentaho on Monster.

2.  How many classes have you taught and do you have a favorite that stands out?

I have been with Pentaho almost 4 years and probably taught 40 classes last year alone.  My favorite class is the Pentaho BI Suite BootCamp.  I especially love the morning of Day 3, because that when we complete the creation of an OLAP cube and can view the data of Pentaho Analyzer in the Pentaho User console.  It is very rewarding to see the result of all of the work and often this is when students have an ‘aha’ moment, and say ‘this is why we need Pentaho, to give our users this power.’

3.  What elements do you think are necessary to make a successful training class?

Knowledge of the product, knowledge of the industry (in my case Business Intelligence) and a sense of humor.  We in training have also made many of the classes very ‘hands on’ which help students learn and retain the product. One of the problems we face in the classroom is that we are teaching students who have a variety of skill levels to make the class beneficial to all we have added  “optional” labs for the more advanced students.

4. Can you tell us more about the Agile BI for Business Analyst class and how it contrasts to the ‘early days’ of training

We began talking about and shaping the Agile BI class over 2 years ago, but it didn’t really take-off.  The product didn’t have the “ease of use” it has today. Now, Pentaho Agile BI has matured to the level where the class is engaging and quite fun to teach since is so easy to create a data model and analyze the data.

5.  As we kick off 2011, what are you most excited about regarding training for the upcoming year?

2011 will add many new key features to the product which will not only impact customers, but will make training easier, as the product improves in “ease of use” it also get easier and more fun to teach.  We also plan to add new training classes suggested by our customers such as ‘Pentaho for the End User’ giving hands-on training for our front end tools and ‘Pentaho On-Demand’ for customers interested to gain more experience with our cloud solution. Things are never boring at Pentaho.

Do you have additional questions for Lynn? Is there someone or a certain role at Pentaho you would like us to interview? Leave your questions in the comments section below. We’d love to hear from you.


How fast is lightening fast?

February 15, 2011

A huge congratulations to our partners at Ingres, who today announced that their lightening fast database VectorWise has set a new record for the Transaction Processing Performance Council’s TPC-H benchmark at scale factor 100. Not only did Vectorwise set a new standard, but it blew the previous record holder out of the water, delivering 340% of the previous record.

Equally outstanding about this news is the fact that VectorWise has not only changed the game in terms of performance, but the database also comes in at a fraction of the price of its competitors. Forward-thinking innovation, high performance, and low cost… sound familiar? It should.

What does this mean to Pentaho users?

Pentaho and Ingres established a partnership last October, with the goal to combine enterprise-class business intelligence with the speed and performance of the fastest analytical database on the market. With over 250,000 QphH (Queries per hour) for 100 GB of data, VectorWise is the epitome of agility at the database level. This means lightening fast query response times, more iterative cycles, and at essence, even more agile business intelligence.

For more


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